Research
in Human Resource
Management

About Us

Research Series Mission Statement

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 Research in Human Resource Management (RHRM) is an annual research series designed to advance theory, research, and practice in Human Resource Management (HRM), and the related fields of Organizational Behavior, Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and Research Methods. The overall goal of the series is to publish articles that (a) improve the effectiveness of HRM processes and practices, (b) improve HRM theory, (d) provide critical reviews of HRM theory and research, ( e) enhance the methods used in HRM research, and (e) increase the degree to which individuals have satisfying and fulfilling careers in organizations. Each volume contains articles that are consistent with these goals.
 

Articles in the series may focus on such specific topics as: Recruitment, Selection, Training, Performance Management, HR Strategy, eHRM, Compensation, Job Attitudes, Job Design, Motivation, Leadership, Groups/Teams, Stress, Employee-Employer Relations, and will consider one major topic per issue. Publication decisions are made based on the evaluations of two subject matter experts and the Action Editor.

 

Editors

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Dianna L. Stone, Universities of New Mexico, Albany, and Virginia Tech 

James H. Dulebohn, Michigan State University 


 Editorial Advisory Board:

Herman Aguinis, George Washington University. 

Derek Avery, Wake Forest University.

David Balkin, University of Colorado

.Donna Blancero, Bentley University.

John Boudreau, University of Southern California.

James Breaugh, University of Missouri-Saint Louis. 

Julio Canedo, University of Houston-Downtown. 

Jeanette Cleveland, Colorado State University. 

Cary Cooper, University of Manchester

Dianna Contreras Krueger, Tarleton State University. 

Petru Curşeu, Babeş-Bolyai University. 

Diana Deadrick, Old Dominion University.

Rodger Griffeth, Ohio University. 

Julia Hoch, California State University-Northridge. 

Linda Isenhour, Eastern Michigan University. Richard Johnson, University at Albany.

Gary Latham, University of Toronto. 

Robert Liden, University of Illinois at Chicago. 

Kimberly M.  Lukaszewski, Wright State University.

Kevin Murphy, University of Limerick. 

Stella Nkomo, University of Pretoria.

Miguel Olivas-Lujan, Clarion University and Monterrey Tech. 

Mark Roehling, Michigan State University. 

Patrick Rosopa, Clemson University. 

Alan Saks, University of Toronto at Scarborough. 

Terri Scandura, University of Miami. 

Rene Schalk, Tilburg University. 

John Schaubroeck, Michigan State University.

Lynn Shore, Colorado State University.

Eugene Stone-Romero, University of New Mexico. 

Shay Tzafrir, University of Haifa.

Sandra Wayne, University of Illinois at Chicago.

 

Peer Review Policy

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 This research series uses a double blind peer review process. All manuscripts are assessed by the editor to determine suitability for the research series. Manuscripts are then sent to two peer subject matter experts to assess their merits and scientific quality. The double blind review process means that the reviewers do not know the names of authors, and authors do not know the names of reviewers. review process. Publication decisions are based on evaluations by the subject matter experts and the Action Editor. The Editor is responsible for the final decision regarding acceptance or rejection of articles. 

 RESEARCH IN HRM IS LISTED IN CABELL'S SCHOLARLY ANALYTICS DIRECTORY

Issues in Series

Human Resource Management Theory and Rearch on New Employment Relationships

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More Information

The Only Constant in HRM Today is CHANGE

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The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0

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Human Resource Management Theory and Research on New Employment relationships

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Edited by :

 Dianna L. Stone, Universities of New Mexico, Albany, and Virginia Tech 

James H. Dulebohn, Michigan State University 

Published 2016

Table of Contents

   Stone, D. L., & Dulebohn, J. H. (2016). Organizational challenges that may prompt changes in human resource management theory and research. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). Human Resource Management Theory and Research on New Employment Relationships (pp. 1-14). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 

  Abstract:

  This paper presents an overview of the goals of Research in Human Resource Management (HRM). In particular, it is designed to advance theory and research in HRM, present literature reviews that offer new directions for research, and consider novel theoretical models that enhance the knowledge base in our field. Although we have amassed a great deal of theory and research in HRM over the last century (Zedeck, 2011), we believe that there are numerous changes affecting today’s organizations, and these challenges create demands for new or modified models and research in HRM and Organizational Behavior (OB). Therefore, we review the implications that several organizational challenges (e.g., transition of the economy and employment relationship, and increased diversity, globalization, and technology) have for the transformation of HR practices, and changes in HR theory and research. We also provide a brief review of the papers included in this volume.


Cleveland, J. N., & Murphy, K. R. (2016). Organizations Want to Abandon Performance Appraisal: Can They? Should They? In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). Human Resource Management Theory and Research on New Employment Relationships (pp. 15-46). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 


Abstract:

  Performance appraisal is often described as the “job managers love to hate” (Pettijohn, Parker, Pettijohn & Kent, 2001, p. 754). Dissatisfaction with performance appraisal is widespread and well documented.[i] Few people like giving or receiving feedback about job performance (Cleveland, Murphy & Lim, 2007), and many of the participants in performance appraisal and performance management systems distrust the feedback they receive (Murphy & Cleveland, 1995). As a results of this dissatisfaction, several large and influential organizations (e.g., Accenture, Deloitte, Microsoft, GAP, Medtronic) have abandoned or substantially curtailed their use of formal performance appraisal systems (Culbert & Rout, 2010; Cunningham, 2015; Ollander-Krane, 2015). Deloitte, for example, has replaced traditional appraisal systems with systems that ask team leaders four simple questions about each team member (Buckingham and Goodall, 2015).


In this paper, we argue that organizations should not, and indeed cannot abandon the sort of formal and structured evaluations of job performance that are characteristic of traditional performance appraisals. First, we provide a brief history of performance appraisal (PA) in order to provide a context to understand current issues and potential future issues in PA. Second, we review reasons why organizations are so interested in finding an alternative to performance appraisal. Next, we show why getting rid of performance might be tempting, but is in fact a very bad idea.


Harris, J. N., Ferris, G. R., Summers, J. K. & Munyon, T. (2016). The role of political skill in relationship development, work and social networks, and work effectiveness. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). Human Resource Management Theory and Research on New Employment Relationships(pp. 47-74). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 

    

Abstract:

  In this first volume of the research series, focusing on “Employee-Employer Relations,” we take a relationship perspective on how political skill demonstrates its effectiveness in the workplace. We examine the composite political skill construct in this analysis, as well as discussing its underlying dimensions of social astuteness, interpersonal influence, networking ability, and apparent sincerity, and examine how this social effectiveness construct helps individuals develop and maintain productive work relationships. In turn, we argue that it is these work relationships that can be leveraged to secure advantageous positions in work and social networks, which facilitate individuals’ work performance and effectiveness as well as reflect back to work relationships, contributing to their further development. Work relationships can be associated with positive work attitudes and well-being, which research has demonstrated. However, we look instrumentally at work relationships as important vehicles to insure favorable positioning in social networks, which then facilitate work performance, effectiveness, and employee well-being. We propose that political skill is fundamental to this whole process.


Scandura, T. A., & Sharif, M. M. (2016). Gratitude as a broaden-and-build emotion at work. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). Human Resource Management Theory and Research on New Employment Relationships(pp. 75-108). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 


Abstract:

Game-thinking, or the use of game elements and principles in non-game settings, is becoming more prevalent in human resource management systems. This article explores the burgeoning trend as it relates to game-based assessments (GBAs) or assessments that incorporate game elements to evoke and measure relevant constructs in employee selection. The authors provide a background for how game-thinking is being applied in organizations, and game-based processes. They then conducting a thorough review of the advantages and disadvantages of GBAs in hiring contexts, covering topics such as assessment development, psychometric considerations, applicant reactions, scoring and cross-cultural ramifications. The article concludes with areas for future research. 

Gruman, J. A., & Saks, A. M. (2018).  e-Socialization: The problems and promise of socializing newcomers in the digital age. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp. 111-140). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract

  The psychology literature has recently shown the importance of gratitude for initiating and maintaining positive social relations and generating positive behavior such as prosocial conduct. However, the role of gratitude in the workplace has yet to be explored. We use the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions to explore the role of dispositional gratitude on employee behaviors and attitudes in organizations. We introduce state gratitude as a contextual form of gratitude and explore its mediating role in the relationship between dispositional gratitude and outcomes. We also integrate theory on psychological capital (PsyCap) as a psychological resource that we propose to mediate the relationship between dispositional gratitude and performance, organizational citizenship (OCBs), prosocial motivation, and job satisfaction. Our model also includes individual difference and contextual moderators. We present a measure of state job gratitude and discuss initial finding on its reliability and construct validity. 


Suazo, M. M., & Stone-Romero. E. F. (2016). A Review of Theory and Research on Psychological Contracts in Organizations. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). Human Resource Management Theory and Research on New Employment Relationships (pp. 109-148). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 


Abstract:

Technology, especially technology that supports e-learning, has become central to organizations’ training and development strategies. As such, a vast research literature has emerged in fields as diverse as education, human resources, information systems, I/O psychology, and management. Each of these fields has investigated e-learning from a number of different technology, design, motivation, and pedagogical perspectives that can inform organizations on how to most effectively design e-learning programs. Despite this vast literature, the findings from these multiple domains are not often integrated, and it is not always clear what steps organizations can undertake to improve e-learning outcomes.

In 2005, Salas et al. (2005) published a review of e-learning design considerations and made a number of recommendations for e-learning design. Since that time though, technology has dramatically changed, and our knowledge of training and learning has evolved. Therefore, our goal in this chapter is to revisit and expand on previous design recommendations by investigating several technology and design considerations such as learner control, organization support, trainee interaction, and interface design. In addition, we review the research on how technology design can affect psychological learning processes and trainee engagement. The results of this review suggest that despite the dramatic advances in technology and the continued focus on e-learning, much more research is needed to understand the linkage between design considerations, learning processes, and learning outcomes. 

Payne, S. C., Mendoza, A. M., & Horner, M. T. (2018). Electronic performance management: Does altering the process improve the outcome? In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp.189-216). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract:

  This paper explores the philosophical groundwork for human resource management (HRM). The goal of philosophy of HRM is to investigate the true nature of people, firms, and the philosophical foundations of HRM. We provide the most legitimate management as the overarching philosophical aim and the distinct and genuine foundations of HRM itself, to enable HRM researchers and practitioners to obtain a deep, balanced, and complete understanding of HRM. As the overarching philosophical aim, we propose two perspectives on HRM, namely, human-to-value creation (H2VC) and value-to-human creation (V2HC). The H2VC perspective takes a human “value creation” approach by utilizing human resources for value creation, whereas the V2HC perspective takes a “human value” creation approach, in which people are organic unities with dignity. We argue that HRM must shift its perspective from H2VC to V2HC. Through various philosophical arguments using the V2HC perspective, we provide philosophical foundations for HRM. Our axiological foundation uses value emergence and relational value theory; our ontological foundation involves social kinds and relational identity; and the epistemological foundation relies on tacit dimension and relational epistemology. We apply these philosophical arguments to HRM research and propose a human value perspective.


Murray, B., Dulebohn, J. H., Roehling, M. V., & Werling, S. E. (2016). Cognitive response—Cognitive structure framework for messaging’s effect on pay attitude formation. . In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). Human Resource Management Theory and Research on New Employment Relationships (pp.193-224). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing 


Abstract: 

This paper explores how electronic human resource management (eHRM) could be used to manage task workers, a relatively new type of contingent worker that utilizes online platforms to complete short-term tasks for a variety of clients. We define the differences between task workers, independent contractors, and permanent workers to better understand the existing work relationships and attachments between task workers and their clients. Task workers are likely to form transactional psychological contracts with the client organizations, which may seem ideal from the contractual perspective but could reduce overall work effectiveness. We then analyze four different triangular relationships that result from the relationships between task workers, platform providers, and clients. Using the employee relationship management perspective, we argue that relational eHRM systems could be used to create more productive work relationships with task workers. We examine three different types of relational eHRM systems, communication, performance management, and training and development, analyzing how they are currently used and how they could be used to enhance the task worker relationship. The paper concludes with future research directions for studying task worker relationships to determine which types of task workers would benefit most from the use of relational eHRM systems.

Ellmer, M., & Reichel, A. (2018). A review and reflection on assumptions about technology in eHRM research. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp.247-278). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract

 Much of the work in compensation research is about employees’ attitudes or behavior relative to existing pay systems with less than four empirical tests of attitude change in the face of an organization’s pay system change intervention published over the last two decades. The compensation environment in contemporary organizations, however, is dynamic and changes in or the introductions of new pay and benefits systems are not unusual. This chapter focusses on the formation of an anticipatory pay satisfaction attitude from persuasive messaging about changes in a pay system or the introduction of new compensation program. By adapting a cognitive response – cognitive structure framework, we identify how the cognitive response to messaging characteristics affects the development of justice, trust, comprehension, and functional assessments of pay, and how the expectancy-value cognitive structure of these variables determine pay satisfaction.

Johnson, R. D., Thatcher, J. B., Burleson, J. (2016). A framework and research agenda for studying eHRM: Automating and informating capabilities of HR technology. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). Human Resource Management Theory and Research on New Employment Relationships(pp. 225-256). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 

  

Abstract

This paper discusses the history of the field of electronic human resource management (eHRM) and the influence of human resource information systems (HRIS) on the practice of human resource management (HRM). Building on Zuboff’s (1985) concepts of the “automating” and “informating” effects of information technology, it then develops a framework that help organize the research surrounding the use of information technology (IT) and HRIS in HRM. To illustrate the framework and synthesize research, the framework is applied to research on the use of technology in recruitment, selection, and compensation and benefits. The review categorizes studies as focusing on the automating capabilities of technology or on the information gathering and decision making support capabilities of IT (e.g. informating). For each function, the manuscript illustrates how the various research questions that arise because of either the automating or informating capabilities of IT are being addressed by researchers. Drawing on research from the field of information systems, it then concludes with a discussion of how research from the field of IT can inform human resource (HR) scholars as we study the use of IT to support HRM.

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The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0

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Edited by :

 James H. Dulebohn, Michigan State University and Dianna L. Stone, Universities of New Mexico, Albany, and Virginia Tech  

Published 2018

Table of Contents

  Dulebohn, J. H., & Stone, D. L. (2018). The transformation of human resource management through technology and e-HRM. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp 1-10). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 

  Abstract:

This article considers the evolution of the field of electronic human resource management (eHRM), and its impact on human resource management (HR). It also reviews the transformation of HR since the 1980s and the influence of computer technology and e-HRM in enabling HR to function as a core business function and play a strategic role in organizations. We define e-HRM as web-based interactive human resource management systems (HRMS) that provide real time information and enable organizations and employee end-users to access HR functions and enter and retrieve HR related data from anywhere through a web browser (Stone & Dulebohn, 2013). This will set the stage for discussing more recent trends in e-HRM and briefly describing papers included in this issue of Research in Human Resource Management.

Murphy, S. M., Fisher, P. A., Keeping, L. M., & Brown, D. A. (2018). “Pounding the Pavement” in the 21stcentury: A Review of Literature Regarding Organizational Recruitment Websites. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0.(pp 11-46). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 


Abstract:

Organizations often use their own websites for recruitment purposes (Maurer & Cook, 2011). For over a decade, the use of these organizational recruitment websites (ORWs) has proliferated, as has the research investigating the role these websites play in organizational recruitment. This research has examined a wide array of constructs relating to ORWs and how they predict recruitment outcomes (Gregory, Meade, &Thompson, 2013; Kraichy & Chapman, 2014; Maurer & Cook 2011). We conducted a comprehensive narrative review of the empirical literature in this area utilizing the model developed by Cober, Brown, Keeping, and Levy (2004a) as an organizing framework. Cober et al.’s model delineates the process by which website characteristics impact e-recruitment outcomes. Thirty-three articles were identified as capturing constructs within the model. Our review discusses these articles by highlighting aspects of the model that have been supported and unsupported, discussing new relationships that have been uncovered, and identifying gaps for future research to explore.

Dickter, D., & Jockin, V. (2018).  e-Selection: The history and future of technology in employment selection. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp 47-80). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.



Abstract:

In this article we offer an update for students, researchers and practitioners about applications and advancements in technology- and internet-enabled assessment (e-selection) tools. We divide the paper into three sections that in general represent the Past, Present, and Future of e-selection. In each, we explore the state of the field, and highlight both relevant research and gaps in the literature. First, we look back at the recent history of e-selection and technological innovations.  Next, we highlight various tools and some of the advantages and challenges currently associated with them. We discuss current approaches to supporting the tools’ installation, validation, and ongoing use in organizations. Finally, we address the future of e-selection. We believe that changes in work itself will have important consequences regarding how and for whom selection is applied. We address the broader societal, economic and technological trends and implications for the future, including advances in automation and their influences on work and HRM.

Bhatia, S., & Ryan, A. M. (2018). Hiring for the win: Game-based assessment in employee selection. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp 81-110). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract:

Game-thinking, or the use of game elements and principles in non-game settings, is becoming more prevalent in human resource management systems. This article explores the burgeoning trend as it relates to game-based assessments (GBAs) or assessments that incorporate game elements to evoke and measure relevant constructs in employee selection. The authors provide a background for how game-thinking is being applied in organizations, and game-based processes. They then conducting a thorough review of the advantages and disadvantages of GBAs in hiring contexts, covering topics such as assessment development, psychometric considerations, applicant reactions, scoring and cross-cultural ramifications. The article concludes with areas for future research. 

Gruman, J. A., & Saks, A. M. (2018).  e-Socialization: The problems and promise of socializing newcomers in the digital age. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp. 111-140). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract

Socialization is the process during which newcomers develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary to fit into an organization and adjust to their jobs and roles. This chapter introduces e-socialization - the process of facilitating newcomer adjustment through the use of information and communication technologies. We specify some of the main challenges and opportunities presented by e-socialization and structure our discussion around the organization-initiated socialization practices that are most widely discussed in the socialization literature as well as newcomer-initiated behaviors: e-orientation, e-training, e-socialization agents, e-socialization tactics, and e-proactive behaviors. We conclude that there are a number of important ways in which e-socialization differs from traditional socialization that can have both positive and negative consequences for the human capital, social capital, adjustment, and socialization of newcomers and that the effect of e-socialization practices on these outcomes will be moderated by the degree of virtuality. Based on these conclusions we offer a number of recommendations for future research and practice on e-socialization.

  

Johnson, R. D., & Randall, J. G. (2018). A review of design considerations in e-Learning. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0.(pp.141-188). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing


Abstract:

Technology, especially technology that supports e-learning, has become central to organizations’ training and development strategies. As such, a vast research literature has emerged in fields as diverse as education, human resources, information systems, I/O psychology, and management. Each of these fields has investigated e-learning from a number of different technology, design, motivation, and pedagogical perspectives that can inform organizations on how to most effectively design e-learning programs. Despite this vast literature, the findings from these multiple domains are not often integrated, and it is not always clear what steps organizations can undertake to improve e-learning outcomes.

In 2005, Salas et al. (2005) published a review of e-learning design considerations and made a number of recommendations for e-learning design. Since that time though, technology has dramatically changed, and our knowledge of training and learning has evolved. Therefore, our goal in this chapter is to revisit and expand on previous design recommendations by investigating several technology and design considerations such as learner control, organization support, trainee interaction, and interface design. In addition, we review the research on how technology design can affect psychological learning processes and trainee engagement. The results of this review suggest that despite the dramatic advances in technology and the continued focus on e-learning, much more research is needed to understand the linkage between design considerations, learning processes, and learning outcomes. 

Payne, S. C., Mendoza, A. M., & Horner, M. T. (2018). Electronic performance management: Does altering the process improve the outcome? In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp.189-216). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract:

Electronic performance management (ePM) systems have flourished and are now used by a large percentage of US Organizations (Sierra-Cedar, 2016). Considering the fast-paced growth of adoption, it is important to determine if these changes are helping or hurting corresponding human resource management processes. In the meantime, another workforce trend is a growing dissatisfaction with the traditional performance appraisal process (Aguinis, Joo, & Gottfredson, 2011; Pulakos & O’Leary, 2011). Although the formal annual evaluation has traditionally been the cornerstone of performance management, there is a growing perception in practice that performance ratings are of little value to organizations (Adler et al., 2016). In light of these issues, many organizations claim to have stopped gathering performance ratings entirely (Culbert, 2008; Resker, 2017; Rock, Davis & Jones, 2014; Rock & Jones, 2015). The purpose of this paper is to describe how technology impacts the performance management process and can potentially address some of the concerns raised about traditional performance appraisal. We propose that technology influences the performance management process in the following five ways. It (a) automates, (b) documents, (c) integrates, (d) structures, and (e) makes the process more accessible and these changes can in turn result in altered employee outcomes. We summarize the limited research on ePM, describe how ePM has the potential to address various age-old performance appraisal problems, and put forward 15 propositions and research questions in order to inspire new research-based insights and empirical evidence to support corresponding practice.

Cassady, E. A., Fisher, S. L., & Olsen, S. (2018). Using eHRM to manage workers in the platform economy. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp. 217-246). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract: 

This paper explores how electronic human resource management (eHRM) could be used to manage task workers, a relatively new type of contingent worker that utilizes online platforms to complete short-term tasks for a variety of clients. We define the differences between task workers, independent contractors, and permanent workers to better understand the existing work relationships and attachments between task workers and their clients. Task workers are likely to form transactional psychological contracts with the client organizations, which may seem ideal from the contractual perspective but could reduce overall work effectiveness. We then analyze four different triangular relationships that result from the relationships between task workers, platform providers, and clients. Using the employee relationship management perspective, we argue that relational eHRM systems could be used to create more productive work relationships with task workers. We examine three different types of relational eHRM systems, communication, performance management, and training and development, analyzing how they are currently used and how they could be used to enhance the task worker relationship. The paper concludes with future research directions for studying task worker relationships to determine which types of task workers would benefit most from the use of relational eHRM systems.

Ellmer, M., & Reichel, A. (2018). A review and reflection on assumptions about technology in eHRM research. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp.247-278). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract:

For research in electronic Human Resource Management (e-HRM), the ongoing diffusion of sophisticated information technology (IT) in HRM invokes critical questions concerning the role and status of technology in theoretical contemplation and empirical analysis. Earlier research indicates that the domain treats technology solely as a general and generic entity. At the same time, scholars in kindred domains warn that analytically waiving technology can lead to puzzling results and one-sided contribution made to knowledge. Theoretical perspectives and conceptions applied in e-HRM research are based on – often implicit – assumptions. These assumptions profoundly shape the questions asked and conclusions drawn from e-HRM research. A systematic literature review of 62 research papers uncovers rich and manifold assumptions and conceptions on technology but confirms that technology is largely addressed only at a very general and generic level. We discuss potential consequences of this finding and call for more complex considerations of the “e” in the e-HRM. To this end, we suggest avenues for theorizing technology in e-HRM contexts more extensively. We argue that these perspectives can bring fresh explanatory resources and open up the domain for new insights in future research.

Schroeder, A. N., & Whitaker, J. H. (2018). An examination of workplace cyberdeviance. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0.(pp.279-312). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing

Whereas the use of technology in organizations has many advantages, it also provides employees new outlets to engage in technology-enabled forms of workplace deviance. As such, this chapter examines various forms of cyber misbehavior through the lens of the four primary dimensions of workplace deviance put forth by Robinson and Bennett (1995). We also expand on Robinson and Bennett’s (1995) classic model of workplace by discussing features unique to cyberdeviance engagement. Specifically, a careful examination of both individual- and organization-directed forms of cyberdeviance are reviewed, including cyberbullying, online incivility, cybercrime, and cyberloafing. A brief discussion of the known antecedents and outcomes for each construct, as well as recommendations for practitioners and future research are provided.

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The Only Constant in HRM Today is Change

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Edited by :

Dianna L. Stone

University of New Mexico, University at Albany & Virginia Tech


James H. Dulebohn 

Michigan State University 

Table of Contents

Stone, D. L., & J. H. Dulebohn (2019). The only thing constant in human resource management today is “Change.” In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). The Only Constant in HRM Today is Change(pp. 1-18). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 

 Abstract: 

 In the 6th century B.C., Hericlitus argued that the “only thing that is constant in life is change” (Ancient Encyclopedia, 2018), and his concept of universal fluctuation is very evident in today’s organizations. Organizations are now facing dramatic changes in the economy, populations, technology, and competition for talented employees. They are also confronted with a mismatch between worker skills and job requirements, and need to find new ways of increasing their agility and ability to respond to an evolving environment. 

Even though some organizational leaders view these changes as obstacles, others view them as opportunities to improve organizations, and increase the degree to which they attract, motivate and retain employees (Stone & Deadrick, 2015; Ulrich & Dulebohn, 2015). Thus, this introductory chapter considers several of the recent changes and challenges in organizations (e.g., change in workforce populations, competition for talented employees, and technology). It also discusses the implications of these changes for human resource policies and practices, and provides suggestions for future theory and research on these new challenges. The article also provides a brief overview of the articles included in this issue. 

  

Locke, E. A., & Latham, G. P. (2019). Does prospect theory add or subtract from our understanding of goal directed motivation? In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). The Only Constant in HRM Today is Change (pp.19-42). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. 


Abstract:

Organizations often use their own websites for recruitment purposes (Maurer & Cook, 2011). For over a decade, the use of these organizational recruitment websites (ORWs) has proliferated, as has the research investigating the role these websites play in organizational recruitment. This research has examined a wide array of constructs relating to ORWs and how they predict recruitment outcomes (Gregory, Meade, &Thompson, 2013; Kraichy & Chapman, 2014; Maurer & Cook 2011). We conducted a comprehensive narrative review of the empirical literature in this area utilizing the model developed by Cober, Brown, Keeping, and Levy (2004a) as an organizing framework. Cober et al.’s model delineates the process by which website characteristics impact e-recruitment outcomes. Thirty-three articles were identified as capturing constructs within the model. Our review discusses these articles by highlighting aspects of the model that have been supported and unsupported, discussing new relationships that have been uncovered, and identifying gaps for future research to explore.

Dickter, D., & Jockin, V. (2018).  e-Selection: The history and future of technology in employment selection. In J. H. Dulebohn & D. L. Stone (Eds.), The Brave New World of eHRM 2.0. (pp 47-80). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.



Abstract:

  This paper critically examines claims that Prospect Theory (PT) explains the results of goal setting theory (GST) and fills in areas where GST is deficient. Issues include: (1) the concept of “mere” goals, (2) claims that goal difficulty and specificity are the same thing, (3) that GST does not take into account reference standards, (4) that it cannot explain the effects of difficult goals, (5) that failure has more emotional impact than success, (6) that effort increases when people are close to the goal, (7) that PT explains the effects of proximal goals, and (8) that people continually calculate the marginal effects of gains and losses before taking action. Moreover, it is argued here that the use of scenarios in which students make guesses about an individual’s motivation are not useful. Worse, real life studies based on PT yield results that are neither definitive nor informative. In short, PT does not make an original contribution to an understanding of goal directed action. Rather, it leaves out most of what already is known from GST research. 


Perry, S. J., Griffeth, R., Hall, K., & Been, J. D. (2019). Theory-building in the field of management: A qualitative and quantitative review of four decades of literature. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). The Only Constant in HRM Today is Change (pp. 43-72). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing


Abstract:

    Stigmas are discrediting attributes of targets that stem from a negative discrepancy between their actual social identity (i.e., the way a target is perceived by an observer) and their virtual social identity (i.e., the observer’s beliefs about the ideal attributes of an individual in a role). Targets (e.g., job applicants) can be stigmatized on the basis of a host of attributes, including those that relate to their physical characteristics (e.g., attractiveness), membership in social categories (e.g., religious affiliation), and character (e.g., mental illness). Stigmatization is a very important phenomenon in organizations because it can affect the way that job recruits, applicants, and incumbents are treated. Thus, this article (a) reviews the literature on stigmas, (b) presents a model of stigmatization in organizations, (c) details the purpose, methods, and results of an empirical study concerned with the scaling of 45 potentially stigmatizing attributes of an applicant for a managerial job, and (d) considers the implications of the study for such human resource practices as recruitment, selection, placement, compensation, and performance appraisal.

Roehling, M. V., Choi, M. G., Roehling, P. V. (2019). Weight discrimination in the workplace: Current knowledge and future research needs. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). The Only Constant in HRM Today is Change (pp. 97-138). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract

  This review integrates the current literature and research on virtual teams. First, I present a three-dimensional, hierarchical and formative structure of the team virtuality measurement construct. Based on Hoch and Kozlowski (2014) the three dimensions I present are geographic distribution, electronic communication media usage, and cultural and national background diversity. Each of these three dimensions is accompanied by its unique set of theories, such as social identity; information processing; and media richness theory, and each pertains to a unique set of practical implications. Importantly, this is based on the concept of a formative measurement approach. Second, I present an input-process-output approach towards management of virtual teams. The approach utilizes the three input factor dimensions of structural supports, supervisory management and team composition and emphasizes the distinction between cognitive, affective, motivational and behavioral processes/emergent states, as well as the moderating role of team virtuality on virtual team outcomes. Future directions for research and implications for management of virtual teams are discussed. 


Zhang, H., & Beal, D. J. (2019). Training Methods for Emotion Regulation: An Appraisal Theory Perspective. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). The Only Constant in HRM Today is Change (pp. 165-198). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract:

  In recent decades, organizational scholars have increasingly recognized that many, if not most jobs involve frequent feats of emotion regulation to ensure successful performance and accelerate career progress. Indeed, the field of emotional labor is dedicated to its continued examination, and practitioners regularly cite emotion regulation as an essential skill of the modern workforce. It is therefore surprising that despite evidence of variation in emotion regulation skills both between and within individuals, there have been very few concentrated efforts to train or develop these skills in the workplace. The current work takes a necessary step toward the goal of training emotion regulation skills, first by providing a selective review of the large and rapidly advancing literature on emotion regulation strategies. We then connect this research to the far smaller and largely scattered literature on interventions and training for emotion regulation skills. Throughout, we explore how theories of emotion appraisal augment process theories of emotion regulation and help structure and guide future efforts at developing training programs. Finally, using mindfulness training as an example, we detail how emotion appraisal components can be specifically and selectively modified to help regulate a wide variety of potential affective events at work.


Abstract:

  This chapter identifies the importance of pursuing alignment among the team-centric context, both co-located and virtual, leadership and performance management, and offers a normative transactional-relational continuum upon which to form alignment. From an input-process-output model perspective, the authors present the role of leadership and performance management in affecting team processes/emergent states and outcomes. They demonstrate that organizations experience poor outcomes when they employ misaligned programs, such as forced distribution initiatives, that do not align leadership and performance management with the contingencies of networked teams. They offer a relational alignment perspective to aid organizations in assessing alignment and as a basis for future research on teams, virtuality, performance management, and leadership. 


Dulebohn, J. H., & Murray, B. (2019). Leadership, Performance Management and Team Centric Organizations: The Importance of Alignment. In D. L. Stone & J. H. Dulebohn (Eds.). The Only Constant in HRM Today is Change (pp. 199-229). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.


Abstract: 

  This chapter identifies the importance of pursuing alignment among the team-centric context, both co-located and virtual, leadership and performance management, and offers a normative transactional-relational continuum upon which to form alignment. From an input-process-output model perspective, the authors present the role of leadership and performance management in affecting team processes/emergent states and outcomes. They demonstrate that organizations experience poor outcomes when they employ misaligned programs, such as forced distribution initiatives, that do not align leadership and performance management with the contingencies of networked teams. They offer a relational alignment perspective to aid organizations in assessing alignment and as a basis for future research on teams, virtuality, performance management, and leadership. 



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Research in Human Resource Management